Welcome

main2Thank you for showing interest in our Veterans Sleep Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. We seek to understand and improve veteran’s sleep through research studies involving both veteran and civilian participants. For more information about our studies, click on the study links at the top of the page, or you may click below to review brief summaries of each.

If you would like to participate in a study or learn more about our research, please contact Rachel Good at 412-383-2129 or goodra@upmc.edu, or text sleepwell (healthy sleepers) or couples (for those interested in the Military Couples Sleep Study) to 412-999-2758.

Please click on the “Directions” link at the top of the page for more information, maps, and pictures for our location.

Study for Healthy Sleepers (SFeRe): Click for details

This study seeks to examine how short term sleep loss affects emotional processing in healthy individuals who may or may not have served in the military.
Looking for participants who:
• Are 18-30 years old
• Are right handed
• Have good physical and psychological health
• Have good sleep

Click Here to See if You May Be Eligible!

Military Couples Sleep Study (MCSS): Click for details

This study seeks to examine the impact of deployment on sleep, cardiovascular health, and relationship functioning within a couple.

Looking for participants who:
- are either married or have cohabitated for at least 1 year
- are between 18-50 years old
- are not pregnant or breastfeeding
- and do not have children less than 6 months of age

Additionally, at least one member of the couple must have prior or current military service and must have deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), or Operation New Dawn (OND).

If you are experiencing a psychiatric emergency in Allegheny County, please call the Resolve Crisis Line at 1-888-7-YOUCAN (1-888-796-8226) or call 911.

If you are military personnel or a veteran outside of Allegheny County and are experiencing a psychiatric emergency, call 1-800-273-TALK and press “1″ for help.